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Action Update: Winter 2018

Action Update: Winter 2018

Find our what Labour Behind the Label have been up to in our bi-annual Action Update.

 

This issue looks at the potential for devastation as the Bangladesh Transition Accord, protecting the safety of Bangladeshi garment workers, is in peril due to a High Court injunction to remove it, jeopardising the safety of millions of workers. Remaining in Bangladesh, we look at the desperate action workers are taking, including going on hunger strike, to demand an increase to the minimum wage. There is information on the UK’s home-grown sweatshop factories in Leicester, as well as our Black Friday action in the face of H&M’s failed promise to pay a living wage. We also celebrate the success of our Invisible Threads fundraising Art Auction, which raised an amazing £2,800.

Read it here: Action Update Winter 2018

Action Update: Summer 2018

Action Update: Summer 2018

Find our what Labour Behind the Label have been up to in our bi-annual Action Update.

 

This issue marks five years since the devastating Rana Plaza building collapse in Bangladesh, and this issue takes a look at which brands have yet to sign the Transition Accord for Bangladeshi workers safety, and marks campaign success as Next, Sainsburys and Debenhams sign up to protect their workers. We are celebrating a transparency campaign win as fast-fashion clothing giant Primark caves to pressure and discloses their supplier list. There is information on H&M’s forgotten promise to pay a living wage to their garment workers, a message to the England football team as they return home from a strong World Cup performance, and a celebration for the acquittal of Cambodian workers rights activist Tola Moeun.

Read it here: Action Update Summer 2018

Report: Adidas and Nike pay record-breaking amounts to footballers, but deny decent wages to women stitching their shirts

Report: Adidas and Nike pay record-breaking amounts to footballers, but deny decent wages to women stitching their shirts

Report: Adidas and Nike pay record-breaking amounts to footballers, but deny decent wages to women stitching their shirts

While millions of people are getting ready to cheer their favorite teams during the Football World Cup, a report by Éthique sur l’étiquette and Clean Clothes Campaign, ‘Foul Play’, reveals that adidas and Nike, major sponsors of the global event, pay poverty wages to the thousands of women in their supply chain that sew the football shirts and shoes of players and supporters.

Download the report here >>

Published June 2018.

Report: How To Do Better: an exploration of better practices within the footwear industry

Report: How To Do Better: an exploration of better practices within the footwear industry

The report presents a short review of the better practices in the shoe industry.

The practices we found were assessed according to how they improved five key areas:
1. Improving working conditions in all parts of the production supply chain (from tanneries to factories) including employment contracts, protection of vulnerable workers, working time etc.
2. Occupational health and safety (OHS) for workers in all parts of the production supply chain (from tanneries to factories).
3. Freedom of association – including collective bargaining, cases of good industrial relations, effective resolution of industrial disputes, and support for trade unions and workers’ rights.
4. Environmental issues including the use of toxins, water and waste treatment etc.
5. Transparency and traceability of the supply chain – including public reporting of audits, suppliers, grievance mechanisms, wages etc.

The report aims to share good practice learnings, case studies and results for others to follow and to share with all stakeholders examples of sustainable alternatives within the shoe industry. It is not designed to be used as a shopping guide nor does it attempt to rank or rate brands. Cases are not examples of compliance with local, international or EU laws and regulations but are examples of significant steps to develop innovative and outstanding practices which provide positive impact for workers and their families.

Download the report: How to do Better

Download the Executive Summary

Published in 2017.

Report: The Real Cost of Our Shoes

Report: The Real Cost of Our Shoes

This report is an investigation into the supply chains of three major shoe brands: Tod’s, Prada and GEOX. It reveals continuously changing global production routes, where the mobility of capital, combined with outsourcing strategies, has created the perfect environment for continuously adapting products to consumers’ tastes and pockets, while driving working conditions and pay downwards.

Recent research by Change Your Shoes, simultaneously conducted in Italy, China, Eastern Europe, India and Indonesia, has demonstrated shoe production as a labour-intensive process subject to short deadlines and very low prices which corrode the living and working conditions of millions of workers, wherever they produce. This damaging trend has also occurred in Europe – enough to generate significant production relocation shifts back to Europe. This report, published by Centro Nuovo Modello di Sviluppo and Fair for the Change Your Shoes project, highlights this emerging trend and the reasons which lie behind it.

Download the report: The Real Cost of Our Shoes

Download the factsheet

Published in 2017

Report: Watch Your Step

Report: Watch Your Step

A Study on the Social and Environmental Impacts of Tanneries in Uttar Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, India.

Every one of us wears shoes every day. But do we ever ask ourselves where the leather comes from to make our shoes? How is the skin of an animal turned into a shoe? Who does this work and under what conditions? This report takes us on a journey to the beginning of a leather shoe. The report looks at the leather industry in India and reveals the social and environmental impacts of tanneries. It provides a glimpse at the adverse conditions at tanneries in India, where people work with minimal or no protective gear, for payment below the minimum wage and no social security benefit. The workers themselves suffer from occupational diseases and the communities around the tanneries have to deal with polluted rivers and drinking water and the dumping of solid waste without regard to environmental standards and rules.

 

Read the main report: Watch Your Step Report

Read the factsheet: Watch Your Step Factsheet

 

Published in 2017. 

Tanneries in India